Posts Tagged Twitter

Episode 83 – Big 12 Previewww

Posted on: December 28th, 2015 by jayhawktalk No Comments

The guys get together to talk after Christmas to do the annual Jayhawk Talk Big 12 Preseason Awards. They also preview the Big 12 slate and talk quite a bit about Self’s philosophy with veterans vs. youth. There is also a good deal of nonsense about Big 12 coaches and a little game called which white guy has a whiter name. It’s a long story. Come on in, and have a little listen to the Jayhawk Talk Podcast.

 

Find the Podcast on iTunes HERE! (Please rate, review, comment, subscribe!)

Find the Podcast on Podbean HERE (Non-Apple mobile devices)

 

As always, ROCK CHALK!

To follow or not to follow – a look at recruiting and social media (2013 ed.)

Posted on: February 13th, 2013 by jayhawktalk No Comments

The NCAA has always grappled with technology and how it affects recruitment.  As the world becomes smaller with every technological advance, antiquated NCAA bylaws become a joke to try to enforce as written.

I should explain up front that I personally follow a number of Kansas basketball and football recruits on my twitter account, @JayhawkTalk. I even interact with them from time to time. The substance of this interaction can be anything from a “retweet” of what they say (E.g., if a potential recruit tweets something like “I am going to have my in-home visit with Kansas Coach Bill Self this Monday. Can’t wait,” it would get retweeted by a ton of KU fans) to a simple suggestion or nudge that KU is a great place to be.

There has been quite a bit of discussion of late as to what kind of interaction I am allowed to have with recruits, if any. Is “following” them violative of NCAA bylaws? What about mentioning and interacting with them? What if they reach out to me first asking for feedback?

I wanted to spend some time researching these issues so that I could become more knowledgeable about what is allowed, not allowed, and everything in between. I wanted to share this with you because I don’t think many understand it very well. I certainly did not.

I should also add that while I am an attorney, I am not writing this to provide any sort of legal advice. This is my own opinion and analysis of what I have found, both in the actual bylaws and how those bylaws are enforced. In other words, should you get a cease and desist letter from a compliance official, take it seriously.  Don’t rely solely on this review as the word.

With that out of the way, leggo.

Texting while recruiting

When text messaging became popular around 2005, parents of recruits began to complain to NCAA officials that their mobile phone bills were rising with every text a coach sent. The NCAA made a blanket response by banning texts to recruits completely in 2007.

When asked to comment about the texting ban (which had just gone into force), Anna Chappel, then head of the NCAA Division I Student-Athlete Advisory Committee said, “If you don’t stop it now, what roads are you going to have to cross later on?”

She could not have expected at that time that the rise of social media networks would force regulators back to the drawing board only a few short years later.

What to do with Facebook, Twitter

Like texting, it took the NCAA a while to figure out what to do with Twitter and Facebook. When the NCAA became convinced that Facebook private messaging and Twitter direct messages were, for all intents and purposes, just like emails, they decided not to regulate them any different than email (email, like regular mail, is unlimited after a recruit’s junior year, subject to certain restrictions).

To the NCAA, it was much easier to try to mold the ever-changing social media world to its existing rulebooks.

Square peg, round hole comes to mind.

After likening direct messages to emails, the NCAA deemed that posting on the Facebook Wall of a recruit or sending a Twitter reply or mention was just like publicizing a player’s recruitment in the media, which isn’t allowed. Regulators again chose to mold new Internet networking into rules already on the books.

But this strategy would only get the NCAA so far.

Not surprisingly, technology continued to advance. It became apparent that recruits were receiving Facebook and Twitter messages from coaches directly to their phones and mobile devices.  Regulators were once again faced with a technological dilemma. Is receiving a Facebook message too much like a text message? Or is it more like an email? Or, worse yet, is it some new blend that would force the NCAA to create new legislation?

Not surprisingly, the NCAA still remained steadfast in adapting technology to its own rules.

It issued bulletins stating that once a coach discovers that a recruit is receiving messages to his or her phone, that coach must cease contact through that medium. Certainly not the easiest rule to police.

As coaches became further disenchanted with texting, phone, and social media rules as written, the NCAA did what the NCAA does best: it threw the issue to a committee. Luckily for coaches, it does finally seem that the NCAA is willing to deregulate some forms of electronic communication, including text messaging.

In January, the NCAA approved a number of wide-ranging changes to the recruiting landscape, including the removal of restrictions on electronic communications, mailings, and even calls. Some coaches haven’t appreciated this new “Wild West” approach to recruiting, most notably those coaches of the Big 10. Regardless, it is a rare step in the direction of common sense for the NCAA. After all, these bylaws are virtually impossible to enforce.

So what does this all mean for fans?

Nearly all decrees and rule changes made by the NCAA regarding electronic communication revolve around the recruitment relationship between coach and player. Very little has been said about what kind of interactions fans and recruits can have through social media. That is probably because to the NCAA, this issue is much more black and white.

Fans and boosters should have no interaction with recruits at all.

Not that it’s stopped anyone. Take Taylor Moseley, for instance. In 2009, Moseley, a North Carolina State freshman, created a Facebook group called “John Wall PLEASE come to NC STATE!!!!”  After more than 700 people joined the group, Moseley received a cease and desist letter from the N.C. State compliance department. It became a national story as First Amendment rights activists went to bat for Moseley by speaking out in the media on his behalf.

Moseley eventually changed the name of the group. (Not sure if the NC State compliance office confiscated this sign featured on ESPN or this painting done for Julius Randle. I digress.)

It’s important to note that multiple other people created Facebook groups encouraging John Wall to come to their respective school, including students at Baylor, Duke, and at least four groups for Kentucky.  There is no indication that the compliance departments at Baylor, Duke, and Kentucky made any such effort to reach out to those students.

What are the schools saying to fans?

We learned two important things from the Moseley fiasco:

First, the NCAA did not ask Moseley to take down the Facebook group or change the name – North Carolina State did. There are very few, if any, reports of the NCAA actually policing individual people from interacting with recruits via social media. That job is tasked to the individual universities, which generally consists of a handful of overworked compliance officers.

Second, compliance departments are not uniform in the way they police interaction among fans and recruits. N.C. State was obviously more proactive in its supervision of students and boosters online. But for every N.C. State department, there are 100 Kentucky departments, which, for one reason or another, do not (or choose not) to police such activity.

Most university compliance departments have a blanket policy on social media on the department website. For instance, North Carolina states the following in one of its bulletins to boosters:

“The use of social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace can very easily be used by individuals in an attempt to influence prospective student-athletes to attend a specific institution. The NCAA prohibits any involvement by boosters in the recruitment of prospects, and individuals who might initiate these attempts to contact prospects could jeopardize the institution’s ability to continue the recruitment of such prospects.”

Other departments are trying to get more interactive by starting their own Twitter and Facebook accounts. You might see @JayhawkComply on twitter, which recently authored this tweet: “All faculty, staff, students and boosters of KU cannot promote KU in any way or encourage a prospect to attend KU, Leave this to coaches.” In anticipation of Julius Randle’s visit this weekend, it also wrote: “KU Fans: NCAA rules prohibit you from recruiting prospects and publicizing their visit to campus, including signs* in AFH during a game!”

**Speaking of signs, I have heard of KU taking away a sign at a game, but only after the recruit in attendance saw it. In other words, bring your Julius Randle signs to the game. The worst thing that could happen is they take it away. Then just start some Randle chants. Doesn’t hurt.

If you continue to look around at other departments, you’ll see more and more of these vague, blanket, overarching statements loosely referencing the NCAA and it Bylaws. All will have the same basic message: Don’t do it.

Now for the real world.

The reality is that university compliance departments have a lot on their hands. They’re understaffed, they’re overworked, and they simply do not have the resources to track everything on the Internet. They must track athletes already at the university as well as prospective ones. It’s an incredibly difficult task.

Consider this scenario: I create an account called “MUTigerBooster” and start tweeting to potential Missouri recruits to come to Missouri to achieve all the riches in their wildest dreams. I could tell them I’ll provide cars, women, booze, drugs, pizza, STD tests, whatever. All MU could do is tell me to stop. There is no subpoena power. There is no name associated with the account. And it is incredibly unlikely that Twitter would disclose IP addresses or contact information. It is a nightmare for compliance folks.

But what can they do?

**Sidenote: Some university departments are turning to computer programs and outside firms to help police online content from their athletes. One such company is UDiligence, which uses custom keyword lists to catch problems before they occur. For a good time, check out the UDiligence website page where they show images that they have caught. Pretty funny stuff.

I contend that over 99% of the online interaction between fans and recruits will not receive any response from the university the fan represents. Don’t confuse this as tacit approval of the action from the university. It’s not. But policing online content on social media websites would take 100 employees, not 5. That being said, most of the time if a violation is reported to compliance officials, they will look into it and issue a request to stop the behavior if it is found to be violative.

**Another sidenote: I’m sure by writing this piece I will be getting a message the next time I reply to a tweet from Julius Randle or Tyus Jones.

My take

The most interesting part of this whole thing? The recruits want you to tweet them. They want as many followers as they can possibly get, and the attention from a particular school’s fan base does have an effect on what school that guy chooses. To say otherwise is ignorant.

Obviously that also means that coaches secretly want fans tweeting to prospects too. It hammers home the recruiting pitch that if you come to Kansas, you’ll be beloved by all of KU nation – and you can see that’s already happening on your twitter feed. Coaches may come out and say that they don’t need the extra help, but I would argue that they are not being truthful. It doesn’t hurt to have some extra help, especially when every other school is doing it too.

I think there is a competitive advantage in the recruiting game to have a fan base on social networks that follow and interact with recruits. Even though the NCAA and the university compliance department tells me not to, I will continue to follow, retweet, and interact with recruits.  And I actually encourage you all to do the same.

Obviously you have to be smart and tactful about it. When tweeting, do so in a classy and respectful manner. And if a player doesn’t choose KU, wish him well and call it a day.

But until I see equal policing across the board from other Division I compliance departments that KU competes with, I will maintain my position on this.

Happy tweeting.

Releford, transition buckets key to KU’s offensive woes

Posted on: February 8th, 2013 by jayhawktalk No Comments

Editor’s Note: Following post brought to you by Taylor Erickson, new contributor to Jayhawk-Talk. Follow him @tc_erickson and find his work on his blog, Rock Chalk Thoughts. We’re excited for him to join the JHT team and look forward to reading more from him.

Let me begin by saying I’m not a college basketball coach.  I have no basketball coaching experience outside of a youth YMCA team.  I did not stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.  I have, however, played quite a bit of basketball in my life, and like probably everyone else reading this post, my mental stability relies heavily on the ability of KU to get their offensive woes straightened out.

This is my attempt to solve KU’s dreadful offense, and offer a solution for how this team can get back on track.

If you’ve read some of my previous ramblings, you know I’ve mentioned several times the correlation between Travis Releford’s point output and our team record.  Prior to last Saturday’s game against Oklahoma State, KU was 38-1 when Releford scored in double figures.  Against OSU, he scored eight points.  Wednesday night in that debacle against TCU, Releford scored one point.  Go back to mid-November & December, when we were playing really well.  During that nine game stretch beginning with Washington State at the Sprint Center, and ending with the game against American U on December 29th, Releford averaged 15.7 points per game.  KU’s average margin of victory during that stretch was 22.6 points.  During conference play, Releford has averaged 10.2 points per game, while our margin of victory has dropped to 6.0 points per game.  Obviously the level of competition has increased significantly during conference play, but there were difficult games during that November-December stretch, and the Big 12 isn’t exactly filled with good teams.  Colorado could beat several teams in the Big 12, Belmont is probably a tournament team (more than what TCU and Texas Tech can say), and that win at Ohio State continues to look better and better.

I put together the chart below to show Releford’s average points in relation to our average margin of victory throughout the course of the season.  I separated the season into three segments based on Releford’s point totals: 0-10 points scored, 10-15 points scored, and 15+ points scored.

From the graph you can see as Releford’s point production increases, our margin of victory increases accordingly.  Common sense says that conclusion is obvious. If we’re routing a team, everyone is going to score more.  I agree completely, however, I think there’s a different conclusion to be drawn.  When Releford is scoring at a higher rate, most of his points come in transition where he excels at finishing plays.  He doesn’t key our offense by knocking down a ton of jumpers in a half court game. Against TCU Wednesday night, KU had zero points in transition.

So what’s the conclusion I’m trying to draw?  KU has been awful at getting out into transition recently.  It feels like we haven’t seen a typical KU run fueled by easy transition buckets in weeks. I don’t recall seeing a dunk by McLemore or Releford for quite some time. The thing I’m struggling to wrap my head around is how a team that is so good defensively has such trouble generating steals and getting easy transition buckets. I’ve read a few columns this week that mention we get into trouble when we get sped up and try to play fast. In my opinion, I think that’s precisely what we need to do more of. Think back to most of Elijah’s turnovers. A good majority come while running our sets in the half court offense.  Elijah, McLemore, and Releford are all at their best in transition, so why not try to encourage more of that?

I find myself thinking back to December when we were a dominant basketball team, trying to figure out what we were doing then that seems to be lacking now. This is the best explanation I can come up with, and one I truly believe has a big influence on our success moving forward. There’s no better way to boost the confidence of this team than easy buckets and few dunks, and it’s apparent this team is struggling for confidence right now.

Listening to national media this week, you would think we’ve lost five or six games in a row.  I’ll be the first to admit, I was awfully down on this team Wednesday night.  It felt like the sky was falling in Lawrence, and we were doomed for the remainder of the season.  I’d love to see us get out and run on Saturday, and get back to how we know we can play.  If we take care of business in Norman, and smack K-State on Monday, ESPN will be preparing a segment for Gameday in a little over a week explaining how the TCU loss was a turning point in our season.  I’m looking forward to that.

Here’s to hoping for a great game tomorrow to get us back on track.

Rock Chalk.

TE

OFFICIAL @FAKEJOEDOOLEY 2012-13 DRINKING GAME RULES

Posted on: November 13th, 2012 by jayhawktalk 1 Comment

(Editor’s Note: The following comes courtesy of @FakeJoeDooley, a phenomenal follow on Twitter and growing legend in Lawrence and surrounding areas. We here at Jayhawk-Talk fully endorse beer, so we were happy to post these for your enjoyment. Reminder to check out the Jayhawk-Talk podcast and “Like” us on Facebook. Looking VERY forward to playing this drinking game tonight. I think I’m drafting Ben. Rock Chalk!)

 

 

Kicking some ref ass.

I. THE “PLAYER DRAFT”

Before the game begins, you must conduct a player “draft.” You’re responsible for draft order. Drafters choose from one of the five starters on the team: Jeff, Ben, Elijah, Travis, or Perry. If you have more than five playing the game, you choose a starter that has already been chosen (two people may have the same starter). Don’t worry about the reserve players. They’ll come into play later on.

II. YOUR INDIVIDUAL DRAFTED PLAYER RULES: (Refer to the draft)

All of Section II is specific to your drafted starting player.

Scoring Rule:

  • Drink one (1) for every point your drafted player scores (E.g., You drafted Ben and he makes a layup – drink two; or, you drafted Elijah and he makes a 3-pointer – drink three). Always remember that these drinks are not meant to be a burden. It’s a celebration. We just fucking scored.

Superpower Rule:

Each starter has a freaking SUPERPOWER. This superpower is specific to only that player. When your drafted player uses his superpower in the course of the game, you give drinks out instead of take them. The individual superpowers are as follows:
  • Travis Releford: Every time Travis makes a “hustle play” (e.g., takes a charge, attempts a charge, flops, drops, dives, or scrambles), give out three (3) drinks to anyone in the room. Feel free to slap the floor with two hands before delivering.
  • Jeff Withey: Every time Jeff has a blocked shot, give out three (3) drinks. Feel free to rub it in by giving the recipient the Dikembe Mutombo finger wag.
  • Elijah Johnson: Every time Elijah attempts a 3-pointer, give out two (2) drinks. If he makes the 3-pointer, give out five (5) drinks.
  • Ben McLemore: Every time Ben gets an offensive rebound, give out two (2) drinks. If he does a put back dunk off that rebound, give out five (5) drinks.
  • Perry Ellis: The Perry Ellis Aggressive Meter (Give out the number of drinks (1-5) corresponding to Perry’s aggressiveness inside the paint as described below:
      • Fruit Fly – Simple, easy lay-up (non-dunk) around the basket.  Allen Fieldhouse gives a golf-clap. (give out one 1)
      • Rabbit – Tough lay-up or dunk with minimal contact with the rim.  Causes high-fives among the crowd. (give out 2)
      • Bulldog – Strong lay-up/dunk that causes a slight rattle of the basket. Fieldhouse’s country club section rises to their feet.  (give out 3)       
      • Lion – Powerful dunk with some rim hanging. Causes the student section to jump up and down. (give out 4)
      • Sasquatch – Thunder dunk or alley-oop dunk (causes Allen Fieldhouse crowd to lose their shit). (give out 5)  

Special Individual Player Rules: (Rare individual player rules)
These are rare instances that your drafted player may play a part in during the course of a game. Watch for these both for your player and other players in the room.

  • Technical Foul: Drink 10 if your drafted player gets a technical foul. Also punch your neighbor and give him or her 10 as well (don’t need to inflict real pain, but it’s your world). You may spread these 10 around the room if you’d prefer.  If Perry Ellis gets a technical, go to your shelter because the world is ending.
  • Posterized: If your drafted player posterizes another team’s player, give out 5 drinks to the room. If you get up and re-enact the play, give out 15.
  • Career High: If your drafted player achieves a career high in points, you can give out drinks to the room up to that total (e.g., if Releford bests his career high by scoring 30 points, you can give out 30 drinks).

 

@FakeJoeDooley is “March Swagness”

III. UNIVERSAL TEAM RULES: (Everyone in the room takes part in these)

These are meant to be community rules and are separate from the individual drafted player rules.

  • 3-Point Rule: Every time a Kansas three-point basket is made, everyone has to throw up the 3-goggles sign over your eye (hold up three fingers in the “a-ok” formation and putting the circle over your eye). The LAST player to do it has to drink 5.
  • Frustration Time-Out Rule: If the other team calls a timeout in frustration after a big KU run or exciting play, find a partner and do a jumping back-bump. Or invent your own “back to the huddle” celebration and tweet it to @FakeJoeDooley and I will post it.
  • Doom$day Rule: If Doom$day is pictured on your television screen at any time take two (2) drinks and cover your girlfriend’s eyes because she’s probably thinking bad thoughts.
  • Pizza Commercial Rule: If your television shows a pizza commercial, take one (1) drink and order another pizza. No pizza days off.

IV. RESERVE RULES:

  • The Kevin Young Rule: Kevin Young is a lot like Mario when he gets a star because he runs around all crazy.  When Kevin Young enters the game, everyone drink 4 because its about to get wild.
  • The Bench Holdback Rule: Dunks are often very dangerous and cause people to freak out. If the bench players are shown holding out their arms to prevent the rest of the players from jumping on the court, stretch your arms out and prevent your neighbor from jumping into your TV and drink (2).  Send me your best holdback pictures.
  • Coach’s Son Rule: If Tyler Self, Evan Manning, or Niko Roberts score, the first one to yell “coach’s son!” gives out 5 drinks.

TWITTER SHIT: Send @FakeJoeDooley pictures of your group playing this drinking game and use the hashtag #DooleyDrinkingGame. If it’s an especially good example of how the game is to be played, it will be retweeted. If your picture is retweeted, give out twenty (20) drinks courtesy of ME.

HELL YEAH DOOLEYBEAR EVEN HAS CHEAT SHEETS: Courtesy of @JoshDutcher on Twitter, download and use these cheat sheets if you need some extra help on gameday. The cheat sheets don’t include every nuance of every rule, but they’ll definitely prove helpful after you start feeling the effects of this game.

DooleyDrinkingGame_CheatSheets_2012-13

 

 

 

#KUBBALL Tweet-up

Posted on: July 20th, 2012 by jayhawktalk No Comments

(Editor’s Note: The following is courtesy of Katherine Hollar.  She is a huge KU fan and great follow on twitter at @katiehollar. We met at a KU basketball game in Lincoln when she tried to run me over with her car (allegedly). She’ll be providing JHT ongoing updates about an exciting film project coming soon to a theatre near you!)

Attention #kubball fans — Late Night is still a few months away, but let’s get our community together to enjoy ourselves “IRL,” talk some hoops and support a great cause, the “Jayhawkers” Kickstarter drive.

Join me, @RckChlkPrincess, @KUTatKat and @Travis_KU at 5 p.m. on Friday, July 27 at Snow & Company, 1815 Wyandotte St. in downtown Kansas City.

All Jayhawk fans and #kubball contributors are more than welcome, but we have some special treats in store for those who support the “Jayhawkers” movie. If you donate $50 or more and tweet us a screen shot of your confirmation or bring a copy of your receipt to the party, your first drink is on us. In addition, we’ll create a drawing pool — “Jayhawkers” supporters can win a game at Allen Fieldhouse with me, a game with @RckChlkPrincess (you KNOW that would be good), and other swell prizes.

You can learn more about “Jayhawkers” and pledge your support at http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/grantbabbitt/jayhawkers-feature-film?ref=live.

We can’t wait to meet everyone — #PutYaShoesOn on and come out! If you have any questions, please hit us on Twitter.

#RCJH #PhogNation #FOE

@FakeJeffWithey’s Dating Advice

Posted on: February 14th, 2012 by jayhawktalk No Comments

Editor’s Note: @FakeJeffWithey on twitter is a great follow. Check him out if you haven’t. What follows is his first installment of guest pieces to JHT. Just in time for Valentine’s Day…I present, @FakeJeffWithey’s Dating Advice.

“I met a really hot girl and she gave me her number.  The only problem is she goes to MU.  What do I do?”

I find that the most effective way to deal with rivalries (and most of life’s challenges) is through stereotypes.  In the same way that you would never marry an Asian girl because you couldn’t trust her to drive your kids to school, stereotypes should keep you from ever considering a Missouri or K-State student, alum, or fan as a dating possibility.  Just think of all that could go wrong with this relationship.  When the happy ending to a love story involves you having a lame “House Divided” license plate on your car, the relationship is not worth pursuing.  And that’s the best case scenario.  How are you going to feel when you’re in your living room watching KU play in the Final Four and your house blows up because of the meth lab in the basement?  My guess: not very good.   The best advice I can give you in this situation is to nail and bail.  No relationship, no feelings.  I’d rather marry a Kansas 4 than a Missouri 10.

“How do I get my girlfriend to agree to a threesome?”

Threesomes will always hold a special place in my heart seeing as how I lost my virginity in a three-way.  Unfortunately I haven’t had to think about them in quite some time.  When you become a star, three becomes four, four becomes five, and five becomes six.  These numbers keep increasing as you inch closer to becoming a cultural icon.

For those of you that aren’t seven foot superstars, threesomes can be intimidating.  The key is confidence.  To get started you should work on another girl behind your girlfriend’s back.  Pretend you’re James Bond and be as sly and secretive as possible.  Once you know the new girl is down, you now have to get your girlfriend comfortable with the idea.  How do you do this?  My personal preference is tequila.  Once your girlfriend is drunk enough, call the other girl over and start getting Withey with it.  Good luck!

“What is the best way to decorate a bachelor pad?”

Most people think that the goal of a bachelor pad is to impress a girl with your decorating skills.  Most people are wrong.  Once a girl is back at your place, you’ve already done the impressing.  Your bachelor pad should be designed to send one message: It’s time to get down to business.

The living room and any common space should be designed to deter lingering.  This means no TV, no coffee table, and absolutely no furniture.  Now to the important part, the bedroom and it’s three necessities.  The first step is finding the right bed, because as the old cliché goes, that’s where the magic happens.  The bed should be comfortable, but not so comfortable that she wants to sleep over.  Next you’ll need a mini fridge stocked full of Red Bull and Gatorade.  This will give you the energy and hydration you need to go multiple rounds.  Finally, you need lava lamps and lots of them.  We live in the 21st century now people, if lava lamps haven’t replaced your need for overhead lighting; you need to get with the times.

Rock Chalk Tweet Tweet

Posted on: January 25th, 2012 by jayhawktalk 1 Comment

Many KU fan signs are inspired by Twitter

I’m into Twitter. I know many of you are too. I got on my Twitter game in the middle of 2008. I started @JayhawkTalk a couple years later, mostly so that I could keep my personal life tweets separate from my KU tweets. Not that there was much of a difference in the two timelines.

Since the middle of 2010, I have watched the KU Twitter community burgeon into quite the social phenomenon. I follow quite a few other fan bases on Twitter in addition to KU, and I’d be hard pressed to find a school that does Twitter quite like Jayhawks do Twitter.

It’s actually interesting how organized KU fans are. For instance, there are bona fide hash tags for both sports (#kubball and #kufball). Most schools can’t even figure out what one of their tags should be (read: #kstate, #emaw, #ksu #ksumbb). There are also funny or unique KU hash tags that people get on board with (#FreeSelby, #FOE, #WitheyBeingWithey, #KUCMB, #MarchSwagness, and #PointPlankn). They come and go, and new ones are always popping up and catching on.

Hell, recently we’ve even seen people playing @FakeJoeDooley‘s drinking game via twitter.

There’s no question KU tweeters aren’t afraid to be passionate too. I see all of the national sports writers retweeting and responding to KU fans every day. Sure, we’re noisy and we like to defend our team. Some of it, though, is that we are just all about Twitter.

Every so often, I plan to highlight some people on my blog that I enjoy following. The list is not meant to be exhaustive or even close to it. I just thought it would be worthwhile to point out a few people every so often that have their Jayhawk Twitter game on lock down as well.

I’ll separate them by category. Also, now is a good place to note that I have extensive Twitter lists maintained from @JayhawkTalk that I encourage you to take a look at if you’re not into following everyone. Check them out here.

Here are 30 folks off the top of my head that I enjoy following for one reason or another.

Always have great KU info: @BHanni @JayhawkSlant @RockChalkTalk  @mlavieri @mctait

Good recruiting info: @ebosshoops @KUTheShiver @EvanDanielscout @AdamZagoria

Folks I always stop to read: @joshklingler @jaybilas @getnickwright @kenpomeroy @mellinger

Fun follows: @DanBeebe @FakeJoeDooley @FakeJeffWithey @KansasHulk @FakeCharlesWeis

Solid KU fan follows: @CassieRupp @kevbo9 @katiehollar @jayhawk_kevin @kutattkat @travis_ku @crimsonandblu

Best KU player follows: @_tee_y (and not close), @dp2nice

Best Former KU player follows: @nickcollison4, @next718star

That’s all for now. Again, I did this off the top of my head, so please don’t reply and ask why you weren’t included. Over time, I’ll do more of these kinds of posts with updated people I enjoy following.

In the interim, Rock Chalk Jayhawk! #kubball #kucmb

@FakeJoeDooley’s Official KU Basketball Drinking Game

Posted on: January 21st, 2012 by jayhawktalk 2 Comments

Editor’s Note: The following comes courtesy of @FakeJoeDooley on Twitter. Give him a follow if you don’t already. We at Jayhawk-Talk endorse these rules wholeheartedly and look forward to partaking in such festivities over some Boulevard Pale Ale and O’Dell’s Myrcenary (Double IPA) just added to the fridge. Cheers!

 

Kicking some referee ass.

I. THE “PLAYER DRAFT”

Before the game begins, you must conduct a player “draft.” You’re responsible for draft order. Drafters choose from one of the five starters on the team: Withey, Robinson, Taylor, Releford, or Johnson. If you have more than five playing the game, you choose a starter that has already been chosen (two people may have the same starter). Don’t worry about the reserve players. They’ll come into play later on.

II. YOUR INDIVIDUAL DRAFTED PLAYER RULES: (Refer to the draft)

All of Section II is specific to your drafted starting player.

Scoring Rule:

  • Drink one (1) for every point your drafted player scores (E.g., You drafted Tyshawn and he makes a layup – drink two; or, you drafted Elijah and he makes a 3-pointer – drink three). Always remember that these drinks are not meant to be a burden. It’s a celebration. We just fucking scored.

Superpower Rule:

Each starter has a freaking SUPERPOWER. This superpower is specific to only that player. When your drafted player uses his superpower in the course of the game, you give drinks out instead of take them. The individual superpowers are as follows:

  • Tyshawn Taylor: Every time Tyshawn makes a crazy pass (good or bad), you give out two (2) drinks to anyone in the room. Also feel free to throw something at them and drop a “point plank’n.”
  • Thomas Robinson: Every time Thomas pretends he’s a point guard (e.g., shoots a 3-pointer, dribbles ball up the court, etc.), give out two (2) drinks to anyone in the room. Also, if he happens to make the 3-pointer, give out five (5).
  • Travis Releford: Every time Travis makes a “hustle play” (e.g., takes a charge, attempts a charge, flops, drops, dives, or scrambles), give out three (3) drinks to anyone in the room. Feel free to slap the floor with two hands before delivering.
  • Jeff Withey: Every time Jeff has a blocked shot, give out three (3) drinks. Feel free to rub it in by giving the recipient the Dikembe Mutombo finger wag.
  • Elijah Johnson: Every time Elijah attempts a 3-pointer, give out two (2) drinks. If he makes the 3-pointer, give out five (5) drinks.

Special Individual Player Rules: (Rare individual player rules)

These are rare instances that your drafted player may play a part in during the course of a game. Watch for these both for your player and other players in the room.

  • Technical Foul: Drink 10 if your drafted player gets a technical foul. Also punch your neighbor and give him or her 10 as well (don’t need to inflict real pain, but it’s your world). You may spread these 10 around the room if you’d prefer.
  • Posterized: If your drafted player posterizes another team’s player, give out 5 drinks to the room. If you get up and re-enact the play, give out 15.
  • Career High: If your drafted player achieves a career high in points, you can give out drinks to the room up to that total (e.g., if Withey bests his career high by scoring 20 points, you can give out 20 drinks).

III. UNIVERSAL TEAM RULES: (Everyone in the room takes part in these)

Everyone in the room will take part in the following rules. These are meant to be community rules and are separate from the individual drafted player rules.

3-Point Rule:

  • Every time a Kansas three-point basket is made, everyone has to throw up the Tyshawn Taylor 3-point sign over your eye (hold up three fingers in the “a-ok” formation and putting the circle over your eye). The LAST player to do it has to drink 5.

Back Bump Rule:

  • If they televise a back bump, you have the option of doing a 10-second waterfall or getting up and doing a back bump with your neighbor.  If you choose the latter, have no regard for the coffee table, drink, or your neighbors that live below you.

Doom$day Rule:

  • If Doom$day is pictured on your television screen at any time take two (2) drinks and cover your girlfriend’s eyes because she’s probably thinking bad thoughts.

Pizza Commercial Rule:

  • If your television shows a pizza commercial, take one (1) drink and order another pizza. No pizza days off.

IV. RESERVE RULES: (THE JUNEBUG, MERV, CHRISTIAN, NIKO RULES)

  • If Junebug, Merv, Christian, or Niko enter the game in the first half of play, everyone drink ten (10) for each. If they enter the game in the second half, everyone drink five (5).
  • If any of these four players score at any point in the game, everyone drink the amount equal to the points scored (E.g., Niko hits a 3-pointer, everyone drink 3).
  • If any of these players miss a dunk, finish your drink.

V. TWITTER SHIT

  • Send @FakeJoeDooley pictures of your group playing this drinking game and use the hashtag #DooleyDrinkingGame. If it’s an especially good example of how the game is to be played, it will be retweeted. If your picture is retweeted, give out twenty (20) drinks courtesy of me.

 

Editor’s Update:

Thanks to @joshdutcher, there are now “cheat sheets” available for playing the @FakeJoeDooley drinking game. You can find the original rules here, but these sheets will help. Especially late in the 2nd half after you’ve played the game for a while…

CLICK LINK BELOW AND SAVE:

DooleyDrinkingGame_CheatSheets

Rock Chalk!